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sneaky Isshin

7owti5 in deviant_moms

Kids and Politics

In the mall last night:

Justice: "Someone said that John McCain was in an airplane and it got shot down and he was taken prisoner in a war or something. But I don't think that means he deserves to be president."

Lotus: "Right. Being a POW doesn't necessarily mean you'll be a good president, either. But people are funny about that."

Courage: "That man farted!"

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

So, do you guys talk politics with your kids? What do you think about kids being taken to political rallies?

Comments

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Those responses seem completely appropriate for the ages of your kids. Kids that know TOO much make me a little leery. It can mean that they have been thoroughly brainwashed. Not in all cases, of course, but I've seen it anyway.

For me and MB the most important thing we've wanted to teach our son is to think for himself. He's old enough now to begin to be able to weigh all the pertinent info in a thoughtful way. We try to give him the most unbiased info possible and then ask him what he thinks. We try to keep an open minded culture in our household - disagreeing is ok.

MB and I have voted different parties before and we talk about this openly with our kid. Time has illustrated how the politics have played out and our kid has made note of that. I think it's helped him to shape his own personal views. I feel good about this because that's what I want my kid to be able to do. It's much less likely that he'll get used to believing lies that are preached that way - any it can happen in any party.

I'm not too keen about taking kids to political rallies - unless you take them to each party's, which could be hard to stomach if you strongly disagree with one. But I do think it's an excellent idea to take kids with you to vote.
Talking with them is good, but keeping it fairly light and open-minded and appropriate to their age is probably good too. :)

I could see taking them to a political rally if it was pretty middle-of-the-road. Either far-right or far-left might be inappropriate.

Yes, no kids here, but I'm thinking about it so I get to comment! XD
I came downstairs after a break the other night to find two sheets of paper that Bear had filled with stuff like:

Barak, doesn't he make my red world blue.

McCain's brain is insane.

Barak Obama is the man.

No candy, No donuts, No McCain.


Hubby insists it was totally un-prompted. Perhaps he overheard the phrases at school, because we don't sit around and discuss such things at home. But, I'll admit, I was impressed! :D
We talk politics with our kids whenever they're interested--religion and sex too. Tonight's dinner conversation was all about the electoral college because my ten-year-old asked. She had a hard time wending her way through the entire process, but I think she got there in the end. (I think we also decided that the electoral college is an outdated relic of bygone days before most people were literate, and that we should amend the constitution to get rid of it). We watched portions of the debates together (till the ten-year-old lost interest and left to watch the Disney Channel). We watched some political ads and talked about what they were trying to accomplish and whether we felt they were fair or right. My kids are old enough to have opinions now, so it is interesting to hear what they have to say.

We're happy to tell the girls what we think and why, but we also try to acknowledge that other people--like our parents, for example--think differently on political issues and that this doesn't make them bad people.

If I could transmit one value about politics to my kids, I think that is what I'd like to leave them with: that well-intentioned, well-meaning people can disagree about the best way to govern our nation, and that we ought to respect their opinions and acknowledge their desire to do good even when we deeply, profoundly disagree with their choice of methods.
kicking cop

March 2010

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